Cannabis improves fertility in tobacco smokers

A new study has found that AM-1346, a synthetic version of a cannabinoid found in the human body and the cannabis plant, may improve the fertility of tobacco smokers.

Two-thirds of male tobacco smokers will exhibit a small or a significant decrease in fertility, some with serious loss, characterized by low sperm count and low percentage sperm motility.

Researchers looked at the potential interaction between two chemical systems that control sperm. "Human sperm carry the cholinergic receptor, which responds to the neurotransmitter acetylcholine," explained professor Lani Burkman. "Nicotine mimics acetylcholine and binds to the cholinergic receptor."

The second chemical system involves cannabinoid receptors, which respond to cannabis (like marijuana and hash), as well as natural cannabinoids from the body. "Research indicates that the cholinergic system and the cannabinoid system naturally regulate human sperm and help prepare them for fertilizing an egg," she said. "This natural regulation is out of balance for the majority of smokers when sperm are continuously exposed to nicotine."

"We think there is an important communication between the cannabinoid and cholinergic receptor systems in human sperm," said Burkman.

Amongst the men who had poor fertilizing potential before being exposed to AM-1346 all showed an increase of sperm binding to the egg varying from 133 % to 330 % (a 201 % mean).

Read the entire article here: Marijuana Improves Fertility in Tobacco Smokers