Documentaries and movies for psychonauts

Nothing on the TV tonight? We're here to help you get through a summer evening by supplying you with four things every psychonaut should watch.

Watch a documentary
The public at large is slowly becoming more familiar with the medicinal use of cannabis. The rather thick layer of prejudice and ignorance is slowly being chipped away. This results in other 'drugs' being pushed into a different light. And documentary filmmakers actively pursuing the topic.

DMT: The Spirit Molecule (2010) is a remarkable documentary. This is a reconstruction of the scientific research regarding DMT by Rick Strassman. Interviews with some of the 60 participants in the experiment result in trip reports nobody will forget any time soon, and these reports are supported by great visuals. Small note, for someone who has never tripped, this doesn’t make it any clearer.

That’s why we believe Neurons to Nirvana (2013) to be a more interesting choice. This documentary shows a broader topic. Not only traditional substances (ayahuasca, mescaline), but also those created in a lab (LSD, MDMA) are shown, without forgetting political backgrounds and sociological aspects.

Watch a movie
Do you want to relax while watching a good movie? There is no shortage in movies that revolve around the use of drugs. It’s a shame these often only further cement prejudices. Users go down, without exceptions. Hollywood does not believe in the smart and responsible user.

A rare and excellent exception to that rule is Taking Woodstock (2009). The trailer is filled to the brim with spoilers, so we won't link to it. This very relaxed movie takes place in the seventies. The main character is the charming boy next-door, Elliot. He has a license to organise an annual poetry and music festival. Every year, a handful of villagers flocks to that festival. This year, many more will come..

A bit rougher is Blueberry (2004). This italo-western is based on the graphic novels about Blueberry, a cowboy. Fans of these comics aren’t exactly thrilled. The hero of the comic regularly uses mescaline, something he never does in the graphic novels.

However, in the movie he does, and that’s why it is of interest to us psychonauts. The director chose this direction because the artist who drew Blueberry, Jean Giraud, regularly went looking for psychedelic experiences. Besides that, director Jan Kounen is no stranger to psychotrophic plants. The scenes where Blueberry is tripping are - we can’t say it any other way - very realistic.

Recommendations please
We sometimes find ourselves on the couch as well. If you have any recommendations for Azarius, please share in the comments!