Glowing in the dark

Nicole Anastos, an Australian researcher, has developed a new test for mushrooms that produces a glowing light if they contain the hallucinogenic ingredients that make them 'magic'.

The technique uses chemiluminescence, a light reaction that occurs when two chemicals react, to detect psilocybin and its metabolite psilocin. These are the serotonin-like psychoactive ingredients in magic mushrooms.

The technique detects extremely low levels of psilocin, making it the most sensitive test there is at this moment. Anastos applied the method on three species of magic mushrooms: Psilocybe subaeruginosa, Hypholoma aurantiaca and Panaeolina foenisecii.

Anastos: ‘In the literature there are quite a few pieces published on the analysis of psilocin and psilocybin in magic mushrooms but the analysis time is quite long in some of them. We wanted a rapid method to detect these alkaloids.’

Anastos says she hopes her research will be picked up and developed for use by the police. It could possibly also form the basis of a home magic-mushroom test kit or a urine test.

Source: ABC News


More magic mushroom news:

DUBLIN - Yesterday the Irish Minister of Health Mary Harney signed an act banning the sale or possession psilocybin containing mushrooms.
Main reason of this ban is the campaign held by the family of a man who died while under the influence of mushrooms. The man, in his thirties, died after jumping out of the balcony of his apartment.
Fresh psilocybin mushrooms are now legally sold in Ireland at around 50 shops. To comply with the law, these shops will now have to remove the mushrooms from their shelves.

Source: Reuters.co.uk