Oh deer, tripping hard!

What happens when spiders get high?
Researchers have found that drenching flies into various toxins, having them eaten by spiders and leaning back to discover the results, actually works better to determine toxicity levels of drugs than most other methods. By examining how different drugs influence the patterns of the spider webs, they could observe how orderly the brain functions during the inebriation. During this it was discovered that low doses of LSD essentially result in more ordered spider webs, while higher doses (and all doses of other drugs) result in more disordered webs.








But this is not all to be learned from animals intoxicated. Apparently the whole thing was their idea to begin with. Psychedelic plants are thought to be psychedelic as a defence mechanism, however, fungi evolved six hundred million years ago around the same time as plant-eating animals. It could be thought that they have the purpose of introducing consciousness... (we hinted to this idea before in another article)

Everywhere you look in the animal kingdom you can find them intoxicated. The phrase ‘to be buzzed’ could well come from bees stoned on orchid nectar. Goats are known to gobble down shroomies, mandrills will go as far as purposefully ingesting Iboga roots and elephants will stick their trunk into just about anything that’s fermented. So prevalent is this behaviour that researchers now believe that there is a "universal drive for mind altering substances".

But wait, there is more...
Apparently the reindeer called shaman, whom inhabit the Russian steppe –and from which the word shaman derives-, have shown a particular fondness to the Amanita mushroom. We could go as far as to say that the Amanita looks like a small, chubby, bearded man in a red suit (especially when you’ve been eating what they have) and that flying reindeer and pine trees are all connected in a way we wouldn't have imagined.